Breaking Dad – My life with Britain’s most notorious meth dealer (Paperback)

“In December 2009 the national newspapers reported the arrest of a ‘drug baron’ with the biggest haul of crystal meth yet seen in this country. The accompanying photo was a mugshot of a scrawny, seedy looking bloke – the archetypal lowlife, a career crook, no doubt. And yet behind the headlines was a story the newspapers never discovered, a story more sensational than they could ever have wished for. This lowlife, this drug baron was in fact, just a few years before, a meek law-abiding suburban family man… He was my dad.” James was a normal student – insecure, smelly, geeky and a virgin to boot – at a normal university on his way home to his normal family at the end of a normal term. His father picked James up in his old Cortina – his middle class, middle-aged father, a respected Jewish coin dealer – and they travelled back to their suburban house in northwest London. Here, James’s teetotal dad liked nothing more than to relax at the end of a long 9-5 by listening to some Taverner or Handel with a nice cup of Earl Grey, musing with delight on the highlight of his day: finding a great parking space near the entrance to Tesco. Never in his worst nightmares could James know that in the next few days not only would his parents separate; not only would they both reveal to him they were gay; not only would his fifty-something father ditch Tavener for Trance, Handel for Hard House and hit the gay club scene of London harder than James had ever hit the student union bar in Bournemouth; not only would his father trade in coin dealing for drug dealing to a catalogue of A list celebrities in his new London flat, which was transformed to a hangout for addicts of sex and drugs alike; not only would James lose his mother to cancer in the ensuing months; not only would his father develop a debilitating addiction to crystal meth; but James’s dad would eventually be arrested with that biggest haul of crystal meth in UK history.

James Lubbock

R220.00

Description

“In December 2009 the national newspapers reported the arrest of a ‘drug baron’ with the biggest haul of crystal meth yet seen in this country. The accompanying photo was a mugshot of a scrawny, seedy looking bloke – the archetypal lowlife, a career crook, no doubt. And yet behind the headlines was a story the newspapers never discovered, a story more sensational than they could ever have wished for. This lowlife, this drug baron was in fact, just a few years before, a meek law-abiding suburban family man… He was my dad.” James was a normal student – insecure, smelly, geeky and a virgin to boot – at a normal university on his way home to his normal family at the end of a normal term. His father picked James up in his old Cortina – his middle class, middle-aged father, a respected Jewish coin dealer – and they travelled back to their suburban house in northwest London. Here, James’s teetotal dad liked nothing more than to relax at the end of a long 9-5 by listening to some Taverner or Handel with a nice cup of Earl Grey, musing with delight on the highlight of his day: finding a great parking space near the entrance to Tesco. Never in his worst nightmares could James know that in the next few days not only would his parents separate; not only would they both reveal to him they were gay; not only would his fifty-something father ditch Tavener for Trance, Handel for Hard House and hit the gay club scene of London harder than James had ever hit the student union bar in Bournemouth; not only would his father trade in coin dealing for drug dealing to a catalogue of A list celebrities in his new London flat, which was transformed to a hangout for addicts of sex and drugs alike; not only would James lose his mother to cancer in the ensuing months; not only would his father develop a debilitating addiction to crystal meth; but James’s dad would eventually be arrested with that biggest haul of crystal meth in UK history.